Telomere Analysis

Case Studies

Telomere Analysis2019-11-04T02:25:37+00:00

Telomere analysis is done by blood test and measures telomere length in order to accurately evaluate the body’s biological age.

Telomere Analysis Technology

The TAT (Telomere Analysis Technology) test is a biomarker that enables risk stratification and early prognosis of various diseases including cancer, by comprehensively analyzing, and appropriately evaluating telomere length that is a factor of age-related diseases.

Our telomere analysis does not merely estimate the average telomere length, but rather builds a histogram of tens of thousands of telomeres and reports the shortened telomeres in a comprehensive manner, including the proportion of short telomeres in chromosomes.

By using and taking supplements containing the telomerase-inducing activator “TAM”, cell basic strength will be improved and telomere shortening will be reduced, i.e. rate of aging. Please see 4 cases where the effects have been remarkable and the biological age has been rejuvenated.

Time-series analysis

Comparison of first and second test results using TAM Spray

Time-series analysis

Comparison of first and second test results using TAM Spray

Case A – Male aged 49 years

First and second test results show estimated biological age reduced by 3.2 years

TAT Test Chronological Age Sex Estimated Biological Age Difference with Chronological Age Difference with last test Median 20th Percentile
First 49.4 Male 52.8 +3.4 -3.2 10.2Kb 5.4Kb
Second 49.9 49.6 -0.3 10.8Kb 5.4Kb

Case B – Female aged 67 years

First and second test results show estimated biological age reduced by 4.6 years

TAT Test Chronological Age Sex Estimated Biological Age Difference with Chronological Age Difference with last test Median 20th Percentile
First 67.1 Female 66.1 -1.0 -4.6 10.2Kb 5.4Kb
Second 67.8 61.5 -6.3 11.0Kb 5.7Kb

Time-series analysis

Comparison of first and second test results using TAM Capsules

Time-series analysis

Comparison of first and second test results using TAM Capsules

Case C – Female aged 36 years:

First and second test results show estimated biological age reduced by 4.8 years.

TAT Test Chronological Age Sex Estimated Biological Age Difference with Chronological Age Difference with last test Median 20th Percentile
First 35.9 Female 48.4 +12.5 -4.8 9.3Kb 4.3Kb
Second 36.4 43.6 +7.2 10.1Kb 5.1Kb

Case D – Female aged 62 years

First and second test results show estimated biological age reduced by 2.5 years.

TAT Test Chronological Age Sex Estimated Biological Age Difference with Chronological Age Difference with last test Median 20th Percentile
First 61.8 Female 70.5 +8.7 -2.5 8.2Kb 3.6Kb
Second 62.2 68 +5.8 9.3Kb 4.7Kb

Tested by Life Length Spain Madrid

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Questions about Telomere Analysis

What is the relationship between biological age and chronological age that we can learn from our telomeres?

Not all individuals age at the same rate even though they may have the same chronological age. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers (other than chronological age) that can estimate the degree of aging of an organism. This information is useful for health professionals and individuals alike to anticipate premature development of age-related issues and to try to consider changes in lifestyle (for instance, obesity and smoking have been shown to accelerate telomere attrition while exercise and good nutrition slow it), to follow more closely our telomere dynamics over the years, or to benefit from potential telomerase activators. Mounting evidence suggests that the length of telomeres is a good indicator of the degree of aging of an organism.

What are the factors that affect the length of my telomeres?

Genetics and lifestyle are fundamental factors that affect telomere length and the rate at which they shorten. Certain life habits have been significantly associated with having longer or shorter telomeres. For example, smoking, obesity and psychological stress increase oxidative stress and inflammation which, in turn, contribute to higher rates of telomere attrition throughout life. Other factors such as diet, exercise, sleep are also believed to impact biological aging. Current therapies are being developed based on telomerase activation to rejuvenate telomeres. Measuring telomere length will be necessary to determine whether these therapies are effectively improving telomere length.

Why do I need to know my biological age?

Firstly, it is an excellent indicator of an individual overall general health status. Secondly, knowing our biological age, it permits us to obtain a better understanding of the lifestyle habits that impact aging and affords us the opportunity to make appropriate changes and by periodic re-testing, measure the results. Thirdly, Life Length’s Telomere Analysis Technology (TAT), will allow for more personalized medicine as doctors treat patients increasingly taking into consideration their biological age.

How is my biological age calculated?

Biological age is calculated using a mathematical formula which takes into consideration the individual’s chronological age group which is then weighted by their telomere length results.

How often should I get my telomeres measured?

We recommend that individuals interested in monitoring their telomere length repeat the measurement annually, although periods of six months may be considered for individuals making significant lifestyle changes.

Why does Life Length emphasize the median telomere length rather than the average (mean) value?

Telomere length varies within each single cell, such that each chromosome end has a different length of telomeric repeats (there are 2 telomeres per chromosome and 23 pairs of chromosomes per cell). Average telomere length is the mean length of all telomeres considered together, usually within a population of cells (not even per individual cell). However, as the telomere length distribution of the cells is not symmetrical, the median telomere length is more representative of this distribution rather than the mean.

What is the difference between median telomere length and the 20th percentile and why is this important?

The median telomere length represents the 50th percentile in the distribution of cell telomere lengths. In contrast, the 20th percentile indicates the telomere length below which 20% of the observed telomeres fall. As such it is an estimator of the percentage of short telomeres in the cells. This is important because mounting scientific evidence shows that it is the short telomeres that are responsible for causing aging and the collateral effects of aging. This is because critically short telomeres inflict permanent and deleterious damage to the cell, unless they are repaired by telomerase. Therefore, to be able to evaluate whether telomeres are prematurely short for a given chronological age it is necessary to use techniques that allow quantification of the abundance of short telomeres. Just measuring average or median telomere length of a population of cells is not sufficient to identify premature telomere shortening. The superiority of the technology commercialized by Life Length is based on our ability to precisely measure telomeres individually, allowing for the quantification of short telomeres.